STATE  OF ISRAEL

 

MASHAV

Israel’s Agency for International

 Development Cooperation

       

 

HEBREW   UNIVERSITY OF  JERUSALEM

Robert   H. Smith Faculty

of   Agriculture, Food & Environment

Division   for External Studies

 

                                        THE INTERNATIONAL POST-GRADUATE PROGRAM ON 

Biotechnology in Agriculture
in a World

of Global Environmental Changes

 

February   6 –  April 5, 2012

MASHAV is the Hebrew acronym for the Israel’s Agency for International Development Cooperation, a department established 50 years ago in Israel’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs. MASHAV is responsible for designing and implementing Israel’s international development programs, carried out in Israel and in development partner countries.

In cooperation with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Faculty of Agriculture – MASHAV’s only academic professional affiliate – we are pleased to announce the opening of a training and capacity building course entitled

 Biotechnology in Agriculture
in a World of Global Environmental Changes

 for participants from developing countries. The course will be held in Israel at the Faculty of Agriculture from February 6 – April 5, 2012.

OBJECTIVES

Today’s challenges are various and contradictory. Increased agricultural yields are needed in order to feed a growing population, negative environmental impacts must be minimized, and production has to adapt to a rapidly- and ever-varying environment stemming from climatic change. New technologies and new approaches, such as improved crops through genetic engineering and genomic-assisted breeding, and the use of recycled wastewater, are being developed at our Faculty in order to address these challenges. Our aim is to provide participants with necessary tools to develop and pursue ways of dealing with increased product demand, with the requirement for reduced negative impact and with significant environmental changes such as desertification, water shortages, salt stress and crop diseases.

 

The course is aimed at promoting the use of new biotechnological techniques in modern agricultural production. The environment is changing and this important parameter will be a central component of this course.

COURSE OF STUDIES

TOPICS OF STUDY

The topics will reflect societal research needs and the research interests of our Faculty. They will be organized around central themes relevant to today’s agricultural challenges and where biotechnology can make a difference:

  1. 1.  Principles in biotechnology

  Introduction to Agro Biotechnology

  Molecular Biology: basics and hands-on practice

  Bioinformatics: basics and computer lab

  Genomics

  Molecular markers based plant breeding

  Microbial ecology in agricultural biotechnology

  Principles in Agro Biotech business

  1. 2.  Agriculture in a changing climate: global warming, desertification

  Ecological Services

  Ecophysiology and ecology of plants, land use under climate change

  Soils under climate change

  Precision agriculture

  1. 3.  From waste to value: recycling waste

  Compost

  Water treatment: approaches and technologies

  Wastewater microbiology and soil functioning

  Recycling water in aquaculture

  Economics of wastewater recycling

  1. 4.  Agriculture under stress

  Plant responses  to  salinity and desiccation

  Microbial inoculation: improving plant growth in under optimal conditions

  1. 5.  Plant protection

  Early detection of plant diseases

  Evolving diseases, evolving technologies

  Enhancing defense plant responses with agricultural practices

  Biotechnology-based pest control

 

 

STUDY CONDITIONS

    Classes will be held at the Faculty’s Rehovot campus, where there are laboratories, advanced research equipment and the Central Library of Agricultural Science. Laboratory sessions will be incorporated in the course, relevant to subjects studied.

    Around-the-clock computer access will be provided, and computers will be used extensively.

    Basic instruction will be given to achieve the required level of proficiency in PowerPoint for preparation of a final project.

    Scientific material and homework will be assigned and graded.

    Professional field trips will be held.

    Full attendance is required.

 

COURSE COMPLETION

Each participant will prepare a final project, which will be reviewed and graded. It should apply knowledge acquired during the course to a topic in agricultural biotechnology. Participants are advised to bring with them digitalized data relevant to their countries. On completion of the course and fulfillment of its requirements, participants will receive certificates, which will be accredited by many universities.

REQUIREMENTS

Candidates interested in attending this program require:

    M.Sc. degree or above in biology or agriculture from a recognized university. (A detailed record of studies and copies of degrees must be included with application forms.)

    Documentation of academic studies conducted in English OR a TOEFL score of at least 89 on the internet-based scale OR an internationally recognized equivalent.  (The language of instruction is English. Therefore, participants whose native tongue isn’t English, must furnish proof of proficiency in this language.)

    Basic knowledge in Molecular Biology.

    Professional experience in the field is recommended.

    An official certificate of good health.

    Letters of recommendation are required from the candidate’s place of work or university.

COST AND APPLICATION

Scholarships are available from MASHAV (see below) to cover the fee for study. The scholarship covers tuition, board, lodging and travel in Israel required for the purposes of the program of studies. This fee does not include travel costs to and from the home countries or incidental expenses.

Application forms may be obtained from the nearest Israeli diplomatic or consular representative or can also be downloaded from the Internet site of the Foreign Ministry of Israel, MASHAV Study Programs.  Their address is:   http://mashav.mfa.gov.il .

Completed applications (2 copies) MUST be sent directly to the Israeli representative in your country by January 6, 2012. In addition, please send a copy of the forms to the Faculty by e-mail to lang@agri.huji.ac.il .

ADDITIONAL DETAILS FOR PARTICIPANTS

    ACCOMMODATIONS: Single bedroom accommodation in a shared apartment will be provided in our fully equipped guest-house on campus. Meals will be provided. Both laundry (on campus) and dry cleaning (in town) are at the participant’s expense.

    WEATHER: The weather in Israel during the winter months is varied, temperatures range from approximately 5-20°C.  There may be some days where light clothing is appropriate, but it might also rain and be quite cool during the season.  Participants are requested to bring clothes suitable for outdoor activities including a warm jacket and comfortable walking shoes.  We also recommend that you bring some light sweaters, long-sleeved shirts, a rain coat and an umbrella.

    INSURANCE: Participants are insured for medical care during their stay in Israel. This does not include pre-existing conditions and /or major dental care. Personal belongings are not insured, and are the responsibility of each individual.

    Participants who take regular MEDICATION are requested to bring enough medicine for the duration of the course. Participants who wear GLASSES are advised to bring a spare pair.

    We recommend that HAND LUGGAGE include basic toiletries and a change of clothes for the first day or so. These should be carried separately in case of delay in baggage delivery.

    Participants will not receive any allowance or pocket money. Please bring some money for SMALL EXPENSES.

    AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION: Those accepted to the course will supply flight details to their local Israeli representative, to be forwarded to us. Upon arrival in Israel, the participant will pick up his/her luggage. After passing through customs, the participant will enter the arrivals terminal and walk towards the left. Go up the escalator to the first floor. On the left, behind the car rental counters, you will see a counter of a company called TOURBUS. This is a special taxi service, which has a list of expected arrivals. Go to the counter and tell them your name, country and that you’re attending a course at the Faculty. You will be taken to the Faculty of Agriculture, Rehovot, free of charge. This service is pre-paid.

PLEASE DO  NOT

TAKE ANY OTHER FORM OF TRANSPORTATION !

 

PARTICIPATING INSTITUTIONS

This 60-day course is truly a joint venture. Involved in its implementation are:

     Academics: under the auspices of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment. Academic Coordinator: Prof. Edouard Jurkevitch

    Administration: by the Faculty’s Division for External Studies in cooperation with the Division for International Cooperation of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs (MASHAV).

MASHAV

 

Israel’s Agency for International Development Cooperation, known as MASHAV in its Hebrew acronym, was founded in 1958 as part of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. It is responsible for initiating and implementing Israel’s development-cooperation program worldwide. MASHAV aims at transferring the expertise and technologies, which have assisted Israel in its own path to development, to other countries. Today, Israel cooperates with almost 140 countries, providing training in Israel and abroad, operating on-site demonstration projects and building medical infrastructures in partner countries. MASHAV is active in fields ranging from agriculture to medicine and from community development to entrepreneurship.

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem was opened in 1925, preceding the establishment of the State of Israel by over two decades. The University was designed to be a world class institution of higher learning and research. Today, the Hebrew University comprises 7 faculties, 15 schools, some 60 research centers, a present student body of about 24,000 and a tenured-track faculty of some 1,500. One third of its enrollment is at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. level.

 

THE ROBERT H. SMITH FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD & ENVIRONMENT

The Hebrew University’s Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment was established in 1942 in Rehovot, a city at a distance of some 55 km (35 miles) from the main campus of the University in Jerusalem. The site was chosen due to considerations of climate and soil conditions. It is the only agricultural institution of higher education in Israel offering university degrees.

Agricultural Biotechnology is taught at the Faculty at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The Faculty’s high level of research is known worldwide. A vast range of individual and group research activities takes place, with an interdisciplinary approach encouraged by various research centers. This course will be conducted in cooperation with The Otto Warburg Center for Agricultural Biotechnology, established at the Faculty in 1984. The Center is geared to conducting research programs both within the Faculty and with scientists in similar fields all over the world.

The Faculty’s Division for External Studies was established in 1986. One of its aims is to expose academic graduates from abroad to post-graduate programs, giving them insight into the achievements and research of Israel in general (and of the Faculty in particular), expanding their knowledge in specific fields and creating opportunities for international cooperation.

COMMUNICATION

Further information relating to the subject matter of the course may be obtained from:

        Division for External Studies

        Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment

        P.O. Box 12

        Rehovot, Israel    76100

        Tel.  972-8-9489509, or 972-8-9489511

        Fax. 972-8-9470171

       Web-site: http://departments.agri.huji.ac.il/externalstudies/index.php

        Director:  Ms. Miri Ben-Haim

        Program Administrator: Ms. Randy Lang

        E-mail address: lang@agri.huji.ac.il

Posted by: israelembassysa | December 8, 2011

A new Mashav Course on AquaCulture: Production and Management

                                                              

 

STATE  OF ISRAEL

 

MASHAV

Israel’s Agency for International

 Development Cooperation

       

 

HEBREW   UNIVERSITY OF  JERUSALEM

Robert   H. Smith Faculty

of   Agriculture, Food & Environment

Division   for External Studies

 

THE    INTERNATIONAL POST-GRADUATE PROGRAM ON

 

AQUACULTURE:
PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT

March 5,   2012  –  March 29, 2012

 

In cooperation with the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture – MASHAV’s only academic professional affiliate in agriculture – we are pleased to announce the opening of a training and capacity building program on Aquaculture: Production and Management.  The course will be held in Israel at the Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Division of External Studies, in Rehovot from March 5 – March 29, 2012.

 

OBJECTIVES

Israeli aquaculture has seen rapid changes since its establishment more than 50 years ago. Whereas extensive carp culture was the main aquaculture activity in the early days, Israeli aquaculture presently comprises a variety of fresh and marine aquatic species, each characterized by specific management methods.

Increasing populations in numerous countries around the world suffer from hunger, malnutrition and a lack of crucial protein in their diet. Growing fish in ponds (aquaculture) rather than in large lakes can provide an excellent source of protein for local populations. Hunger can be alleviated by utilizing existing water resources for the individual needs of the people living there.

The main problem is dwindling catches from the lakes and undeveloped aquaculture thus creating a big gap between supply and demand of fish for human consumption. These countries are endowed with abundant aquatic resources but have not been able to realize substantial production from aquaculture due to lack of technology in all aspects. Training of key leaders that belong either to the local academia or experts in the field will be equipped with the pre-requisite skills for increased aquaculture production on a commercial and sustainable basis. This is the guiding principle behind this program.

The program is intended to present the students with various aspects and developments of aquaculture with emphasis on the Israeli expertise, and to share experiences and know-how. Theoretical aspects of aquaculture (e.g. physiology, genetics, endocrinology, microbiology, reproduction) as well as more applied aspects (e.g. culture methods, breeding programs, species selection) are presented through frontal lectures and case studies as well as excursions and hands-on experience. It is geared for countries that have fresh water that can enable sustainable aquaculture.

The teaching staff comprises Faculty staff members as well as experts from other academic and governmental institutes. The program will especially benefit those participants with theoretical and practical experience in the aquaculture field.

Professor Berta Levavi-Sivan, the program coordinator from the Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, has recently completed a 4-year project whose purpose was to combat depleted fish supplies in Lake Victoria. This project’s success exceeded all expectations and created a breakthrough by improving the level of protein in the population with increased fish consumption and has led to further collaboration between several research institutions from Uganda with the support of the Hebrew University.

It is our anticipation that participants will enrich their respective countries with new scientific knowledge and research approaches, while simultaneously establishing a basis for future research cooperation between the participants and the researchers at the Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environment. We also encourage follow-up programs in participants’ home countries.

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

    General aspects of aquaculture

    Fish physiology and immunology

    Reproduction and larviculture

    Fish genetics

    Fish diseases

    Fish nutrition and feed technology

    Water quality and aquacultural engineering

    Rearing of other aquatic animals than fish (algae, crustaceans, bivalves, etc.)

    Fish behavior

 

STUDY CONDITIONS

    Classes will be held at the Faculty’s Rehovot campus, where there are laboratories, advanced research equipment and the Central Library of Agricultural Science.

    Around-the-clock computer access will be provided, and computers will be used extensively.

    Basic instruction will be given to achieve the required level of proficiency in PowerPoint for preparation of a final project.

    Scientific material and homework will be assigned and graded.

    Professional field trips will be held.

    Full attendance is required.

 

PROGRAM COMPLETION

Each participant will prepare a final project, which will be reviewed and graded. It should apply knowledge acquired during the program to a topic in Aquaculture.  Participants are advised to bring with them digitalized data relevant to their countries. On completion of the program and fulfillment of its requirements, participants will receive certificates, which will be accredited by many universities.

REQUIREMENTS

Candidates interested in attending this program require:

    An academic degree (B.Sc. or M.Sc.) in biology, animal sciences, agriculture, or in a related field from a recognized university.

    An authorized certificate of English proficiency at a level of at least 89 on the TOEFL new Internet based scale or an internationally recognized equivalent.

    A detailed record of studies and copies of degrees must be included with application forms.

    An official certificate of good health.

    Professional experience in the field of aquaculture is preferable.

    Letters of recommendation from the candidate’s place of work or study.

COST AND APPLICATION

Scholarships are available from MASHAV (see below) to cover the fee for study. The scholarship covers tuition, board, lodging and travel in Israel required for the purposes of the program of studies. This fee does not include travel costs to and from the home countries or incidental expenses.

Application forms may be obtained from the nearest Israeli diplomatic or consular representative or can also be downloaded from the Internet site of the Foreign Ministry of Israel, MASHAV Study Programs.

Their address is: http://mashav.mfa.gov.il

Completed applications (2 copies) MUST be sent directly to the Israeli representative in your country by February 3, 2012. In addition, please send a copy of the forms to the Faculty by e-mail to malab@agri.huji.ac.il .

PARTICIPATING INSTITUTIONS

This 25-day course is truly a joint venture. Involved in its implementation are:

    Academics are under the auspices of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment.

     The Faculty’s Division for External Studies administers the course.

    The course is conducted in cooperation with the Agency for International Development Cooperation of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs (MASHAV).

 

MASHAV

 

Israel’s Agency for International Development Cooperation, known as MASHAV in its Hebrew acronym, was founded in 1958 as part of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. It is responsible for initiating and implementing Israel’s development-cooperation program worldwide. MASHAV aims at transferring the expertise and technologies, which have assisted Israel in its own path to development, to other countries. Today, Israel cooperates with almost 140 countries, providing training in Israel and abroad, operating on-site demonstration projects and building medical infrastructures in partner countries. MASHAV is active in fields ranging from agriculture to medicine and from community development to entrepreneurship.

THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem was opened in 1925, preceding the establishment of the State of Israel by over two decades. The University was designed to be a world class institution of higher learning and research. Today, the Hebrew University comprises 7 faculties, 15 schools, some 60 research centers, a present student body of about 24,000 and a tenured-track faculty of some 1,500. One third of its enrollment is at the M.Sc. and Ph.D. level.

 

THE ROBERT H. SMITH FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD & ENVIRONMENT

The Hebrew University’s Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment was established in 1942 in Rehovot, a city at a distance of some 55 km (35 miles) from the main campus of the University in Jerusalem. The site was chosen due to considerations of climate and soil conditions. It is the only agricultural institution of higher education in Israel offering university degrees.

The Faculty’s Division for External Studies was established in 1986. One of its aims is to expose academic graduates from abroad to post-graduate programs, giving them insight into the achievements and research of Israel in general (and of the Faculty in particular), expanding their knowledge in specific fields and creating opportunities for international cooperation.

ADDITIONAL DETAILS FOR PARTICIPANTS

ACCOMMODATIONS: Single bedroom accommodation in a shared apartment will be provided in our fully equipped guest-house on campus. Meals will be provided. Both laundry (on campus) and dry cleaning (in town) are at the participant’s expense.

    WEATHER: The weather in Israel during the winter months is varied, approximately 10-22° C.  There may be some sunny days where light clothing is appropriate, but it might also rain and be cool during the season.  Participants are requested to bring clothes suitable for outdoor activities including a warm jacket and comfortable walking shoes.  We also recommend that you bring some light sweaters, long-sleeved shirts, a rain coat and an umbrella.

INSURANCE: Participants are insured for medical care during their stay in Israel. This does not include pre-existing conditions and /or major dental care. Personal belongings are not insured, and are the responsibility of each individual.

Participants who take regular MEDICATION are requested to bring enough medicine for the duration of the course. Participants who wear GLASSES are advised to bring a spare pair.

We recommend that HAND LUGGAGE include basic toiletries and a change of clothes for the first day or so. These should be carried separately in case of delay in baggage delivery.

Participants will not receive any allowance or pocket money. Please bring some money for SMALL EXPENSES.

AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION: Those accepted to the course will supply flight details to their local Israeli representative, to be forwarded to us. Upon arrival in Israel, the participant will pick up his/her luggage. After passing through customs, the participant will enter the arrivals terminal and walk towards the left. Go up the escalator to the first floor. On the left, behind the car rental counters, you will see a counter of a company called TOURBUS. This is a special taxi service, which has a list of expected arrivals. Go to the counter and tell them your name, country and that you’re attending a course at the Faculty. You will be taken to the Faculty of Agriculture, Rehovot, free of charge. This service is pre-paid.


   PLEASE DO NOT TAKE ANY OTHER FORM OF TRANSPORTATION.

COMMUNICATION

Further information relating to the subject matter of the course may be obtained from:

        Division for External Studies

        Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Environment

        P.O. Box 12

        Rehovot, Israel    76100

        Tel.  972-8-9489344 or 972-8-9489509, or 972-8-9489511

        Fax. 972-8-9470171

       Web-site: http://departments.agri.huji.ac.il/externalstudies/index.php

        Director:  Ms. Miri Ben-Haim

        Program Administrator: Ms. Mala Braslavsky

        E-mail address: malab@agri.huji.ac.il

Saving   the Stones -

Saving   The Stones (STS) – an introductory training program in historical and archeological conservation.  This five   month course is for college graduates from diverse fields such as   Archaeology, architecture, history, art, and other disciplines.  The program provides students with a basic   foundation in conservation by introducing them to the practical skills,   procedures, and theory of conservation.

STS is   based in Acre, one of the oldest port cities in the world and a UNESCO World   Heritage site. The program enables students to join the Israel Antiquity   Authority teams of conservators, architects and archaeologists who work in   Acre. Students gain experience in ancient masonry work and other ancient   building materials. Participants will be exposed to all conservation   procedures; historic documentation, site surveying, treatment planning, etc.   and  will be able to experience   first-hand the diverse areas of conservation work.  Acre is a city which bares great evidence   of many ancient cultures including the Hellenistic, Roman, Mamluk, the   Crusaders, the Ottoman Empire and the British mandate.

In   addition, one day a week students will tour active archaeological   excavations, receive a ‘behind the scenes’ glimpse into the archaeological   process, and meet prominent professionals in the field.  Students will engage in a major   archaeological dig or a conservation project in Jerusalem as well. Besides   hands-on conservation work, students will enjoy a rich cultural and social   experience.

Upon   completion of all practical and theoretical aspects of the program, students   will receive an Israel Antiquity Authority Conservation certificate.

The   program opens twice each year: February and September

Open To:   University graduates in the fields of –  Conservation, History, Art, Design,   Archeology, Architecture, Middle Eastern Studies, Museum Studies and   Religion.

General Syllabus

The program includes 6 basic units   over a period of 5 months:

    • Unit 1 – Introduction to Conservation
  • Unit 2 – Basic Conservation Principles
  • Unit 3 – Associated Professions
  • Unit 4 – Techniques and Materials
  • Unit 5 – Practical Project in Jerusalem
  • Unit 6 – Final Project

Subjects:

Unit 1 – Introduction to Conservation

    • 1.1 History of Conservation
  • 1.2 Philosophy of Conservation
  • 1.3 Value Analysis of Findings and Evidences
  • 1.4 The Conservation Procedure
  • 1.5 Basic Concepts

Unit 2 – Basic Conservation Principles

    • 2.1 International and Israelis Conservation Bodies
  • 2.2 Conservation Conventions
  • 2.3 International and Israeli Conservation        Legislation

Unit 3 – Associated Professions

    • 3.1 Archaeology – Legislation, Basic Principles,        Excavation and Objects
  • 3.2 Architecture for Conservation – History and        Typology in Israel
  • 3.3 Engineering for Conservation – Building        Technologies

Unit 4 – Techniques and Materials

    • 4.1 Documentation
  • 4.2 Planning for Conservation
  • 4.3 Plaster Conservation
  • 4.4 Stone Conservation
  • 4.5 Mud Conservation
  • 4.6 Fresco Conservation
  • 4.7 Mosaic Conservation

Unit 5 – Practical Project in Jerusalem

Unit 6 – Final Project

A full ‘week by week’ program can be found at: http://www.antiquities.org.il/akko/week.asp

Behind The Headlines: The Goldstone Report refuted by Goldstone himself 3-Apr-2011.

Posted by: israelembassysa | March 16, 2011

Israel Navy uncovers weaponry on-board cargo vessel 15-Mar-2011

Israel Navy uncovers weaponry on-board cargo vessel 15-Mar-2011.

Posted by: israelembassysa | March 16, 2011

Israel Navy uncovers weaponry on-board cargo vessel

 Israel Navy uncovers weaponry on-board cargo vessel

Iranian Made Missile Found on-board the Victoria headed for Gaza Strip


Missile identification document in Persian bearing the Iranian governmental emblem found onboard the Victoria, noting the name of the missile (“Nasser”), the missile system (C-704), and date of manufacture. (Photos: IDF Spokesperson)

Yesterday, On the 15th of March 2011, the Israeli Naval Forces boarded and searched the Liberian flagged vessel VICTORIA, after receiving the consent of the ship’s captain.  The boarding was based upon confirmed reports that the vessel was carrying illicit arms destined for terrorist organizations in the Gaza Strip. The ship was off the coast of Israel, in the open waters of the Mediterranean Sea.

In a preliminary search by the boarding party, the vessel was found to be carrying significant amounts of arms and military equipment. Nothing in the freight manifest of the Victoria revealed the true nature of the content of the ship’s containers, in violation of the relevant provisions of the International Maritime Organization’s Conventions and professional standards, including the Convention on the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) and the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code.

 According to the ship’s document, and the account of the crew, the ship initially departed from Latakia port in Syria, and then proceeded to Mersin Port in Turkey. The ship was bound for Egypt.

It has been determined that Turkey had no connection to the arms smuggling attempt. 

This attempt at smuggling large amounts of weaponry aboard the Victoria provides  an additional proof of Israel’s imperative need to examine all goods entering the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip. Israel cannot allow weapons and military equipment to reach the hands of terrorists, who will use them against its civilian population.

The illegal smuggling of arms to the Gaza Strip poses a direct and imminent threat to the safety and security of the State of Israel and its citizens, who continue to find themselves under the unceasing attack of rocket and mortar fire originating from Gaza. 

Preliminary evidence indicates that the weapons aboard the ship originated in Iran, which strives to arm the Gaza Strip.

Under Hamas rule, the Gaza Strip has become part of the Iranian-Syrian-Hamas axis.

Such transfer of weaponry to terrorist organizations in the Gaza Strip constitutes a blatant violation of UN Security Council Resolution 1860(2009), which calls upon Member States to intensify efforts to “prevent illicit trafficking in arms and ammunition” to the Gaza Strip (para. 6), as well as a violation of UN Security Council Resolution 1373(2001), which, inter alia, calls upon all States to refrain from the provision of any form of support to terrorist organizations and to eliminate the supply of weapons to such groups.

This is not the first time that a smuggling attempt is being carried out - There have been a number of previous instances (including incidents involving the Santorini, Abu Hassan, the Karine A, the Hansa India, the Monchegorsk, the Francop and Everest cargo vessels) in which otherwise innocent transnational commercial shipping was abused by States that sponsor terrorism, including Iran, Syria and Lebanon, in order to facilitate the illegal trafficking of arms to terrorist organizations in the region.

For more info and pictures, Follow these 2 links.

http://bit.ly/ArmsShips

http://www.flickr.com/photos/idfonline/sets/72157626272235856/show

Posted by: israelembassysa | March 14, 2011

Israel exposes Palestinian Authority Incitement.

Five members of the Fogel family killed in terror attack in Itamar

Israel exposes Palestinian Authority Incitement

The horrible terrorist attack Friday night in the community of Itamar, in which a mother, father and three children were brutally murdered, has placed the issue of Palestinian incitement on the public agenda once again. Incitement in official Palestinian Authority (PA) channels against Israel encourages attacks against civilians, raises mass-murderers to the status of national heroes, and perpetuates a culture of rejectionism. For this reason the Israeli Government has created the “Incitement and Culture of Peace Index” as a mechanism to track levels of incitement.

 In wake of the terrorist attack, the Index was presented to the Government today.

Here is the link to the Index

               CLICK HERE 

Posted by: israelembassysa | March 14, 2011

Fogel family stabbed to death

A volunteer carries the body of 3-month-old Hadas from her house where she was killed together with her parents and two brothers (Photo: Reuters)

At least one terrorist infiltrated the West Bank settlement of Itamar, southeast of Nablus, late Friday night (11 March) and stabbed to death Udi (36) and Ruth (35) Fogel, and their children Yoav, 11, Elad, 4, and 3-month-old Hadas. Their 12-year-old daughter, who returned home later, went to a neighbor for assistance when no one opened the locked door to her home. Two brothers, aged 8 and 2, were spared. Security forces canvassing the area overnight estimated that the terrorists managed to escape back into the Palestinian territories.

Following are Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu‘s remarks from Saturday, 12 March 2011, about the massacre in Itamar:

“I would like to express my deep outrage, outrage which is certainly felt by every Israeli over the murder of a young family – father, mother, eleven-year-old boy, four-year-old-boy and four-month-old girl.  Three orphaned children have been left in this family. One of the girls saw her parents and siblings stabbed to death. The family was brutally murdered in their sleep on the Sabbath. We embrace and support the orphans and the other members of the family. We embrace and support our brothers who reside in Judea and Samaria. Do not be disheartened. I know that this is a difficult time for us, but the entire nation is with you. Since the disaster, this awful murder, became known, I have held discussions with Defense Minister Ehud Barak, IDF Chief-of-Staff, Lt.-Gen. Benny Gantz, ISA Director Yuval Diskin and other senior security officials. I instructed them to make every effort to find the murderers and not to rest until they have been found and brought to justice.

I expect the international community to sharply and unequivocally condemn this murder, the murder of children. I have noticed that several countries that always hasten to the UN Security Council in order to condemn Israel, the state of the Jews, for planning a house in some locality, or for laying some tiles somewhere, have been dilatory in sharply condemning the murder of Jewish infants. I expect them to issue such condemnations immediately, without balances, without understandings, without justifications. There is no justification and there can be neither excuse nor forgiveness for the murder of children. I expect a similar condemnation, and I demand a similar condemnation, from the Palestinian Authority. I am disappointed by the weak and mumbled statements. This is not how one condemns terrorism. This is not how one fights terrorism. See how Israeli prime ministers, myself among them, have reacted in similar situations, but there has never been anything like this, in which terrorists entered a home and cut children’s throats.

This requires sharp and unequivocal condemnation. This requires something else. This requires a halt to the incitement.  I demand that the Palestinian Authority stop the incitement that is conducted on a daily basis in their schools, mosques and the media under their control. The time has come to stop this double-talk in which the Palestinian Authority outwardly talks peace, and allows – and sometimes leads – incitement at home. The time has come to stop the incitement and begin educating their people for peace.

Despite all the awful pain, I call upon all Israelis to act responsibly, with restraint, and not to take the law into their own hands. When one takes the law into his own hands, there is no law. The IDF and the security forces will carry out their responsibilities; only they. We will not allow terrorism to determine the settlement map. The settlement map will be determined by Government policy, which is in accordance with our national interests, with security first and foremost. Terrorism will not determine the settlement map. We will determine it.”

President Shimon Peres releases statement on despicable murder in Itamar Friday night

 “This is one of the most difficult and despicable events that we have seen – the murder of parents and their young children including a 3-year-old and a one-month-old baby, on the Sabbath.  It indicates a loss of humanity.  There is no religion in the world or any faith that allows these kinds of horrible acts. 

There are no words of consolation in the face of this devastation.  Our hearts are with the orphans and with the community of Itamar during this extremely difficult time.  I am sure that the security forces will make every possible effort in order to capture the murderers and bring them to the appropriate justice.”

Response of FM Liberman to terror attack in Itamar 

12 March 2011

Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman instructed the Israeli delegation to the United Nations to file a harsh complaint to the UN secretary-general and the president of the Security Council, following the terror attack in the Samarian community of Itamar on Friday night. He also said that Israel is expecting to hear a strong condemnation from all democratic states, which, in the name of human rights, hasten to denounce every movement of a caravan in Judea and Samaria, but as of last night have yet to condemn the cruel murder of an entire family, including a three-month-old baby. He added that the fact that the Palestinian Authority has yet to condemn the attack “says more than anything about the true nature of someone who is supposed to be a partner to negotiations.”

Boycotting Israel is anti-Semitic, hypocritical, and can only worsen the conflict

Article by Denis McShane,   former British Labor MP who also served as minister of state for Europe         

            Denis McShane – ‘Kauft nicht bei Juden’ will only worsen conflict (JPostDecember 14 2010)

Ambassador Dov Segev-Steinberg’s article published in The Star Dec 8th 2010 in response to Alan Boesak-Farid Esack piece of Nov 10.

CLICK HERE

Once opened, scroll down to page 2

Older Posts »

Categories

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.